Tag Archives: Martinique

Fiasco: HMS Circe and Consorts vs. Cygne

We’ve chronicled in several places the success of British ships in cutting out expeditions and small boat actions. One is left in awe of the casualness with which British sailors took on impossible odds and carried the day. Often they did it with few if any casualties.

Cutting out an enemy ship, or an enemy convoy, was a high risk activity and fraught with danger. Because repeated success breed hubris, there seems to have only rarely been a consideration made that an action was ill advised. Because of that sometimes things did not go according to plan. Continue reading

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Filed under Age of Sail, Lord Ramage Novels, Naval Operations, Smal Boat Actions

…I have named her, Sir, after yourself,—the Undaunted

HMS Zebra providing covering fire to Commander Robert Faulknor at Fort Louis, Martinique

HMS Zebra providing covering fire to Commander Robert Faulknor at Fort Louis, Martinique

We’ve mentioned a few times that the writers of naval fiction set during the Age of Sail have an immense amount of material available to them that only needs minor adjustments to read as fiction.

For instance, the HMS Cockerel, an Alan Lewrie novel by Dewey Lambdin, there is an interesting scene set at the end of the novel. The setting is a dinner aboard the flagship of Admiral Sir Samuel Hood. Lieutenant Lewrie is fresh from the siege of Toulon where he managed to capture a French corvette. The corvette is named San Culotte (in real life a 118-gun first rate) and Lewrie jokes about how it will have to be renamed as it would quickly be known as the “Bare Assed” by British sailors. Hood is amused and renames the Sans Culotte the HMS Jester in honor of Lewrie’s wit and appoints him into her as commander.

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Filed under Age of Sail, Alan Lewrie Novels, Naval Operations, Naval Operations Ashore, The Rest of the Story